Tag: palazzo in Venice

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    Palazzo Surian Bellotto

    Palazzo Surian Bellotto is a palace with an impressive facade, located in Venice, in the sestiere of Cannaregio, overlooking the Canale di Cannaregio.   SHORT HISTORY The palace was built by the Surian family in the 17th century, on a project attributed to the architect Giuseppe Sardi, who was also the author of the nearby Palazzo Savorgnan. At the end of the same century, the palace was ceded to the Bellottos. In the 18th century, it became the Venetian seat of the French embassy. During this period, the philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau lived there. After the fall of the Republic of Venice, in the 19th century, the palace entered a long period of degradation, during which the sumptuous interiors and the beautiful decorations were irretrievably lost. Now, the palace is a private residence.   ARCHITECTURE The best preserved and most important feature of Palazzo Surian is the large Baroque facade, which, with its four stories high, stands out above the neighboring buildings. The facade is asymmetrical, having the central axis shifted to the left. On the ground floor, there are two portals with curved masonry, inserted in an ashlar band. To the portals correspond, on the main floors, two pairs of Read more [...]

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    Palazzo Civran

    Palazzo Civran is a palace in Venice, located in the Cannaregio district, overlooking the Grand Canal, near the Fontego dei Tedeschi and the Rialto Bridge.   SHORT HISTORY The Civran family owned the palazzo since the 14th century, when it was built in Gothic style. Currently, the building is state-owned and is home to the Guardia di Finanza.   ARCHITECTURE The current appearance of the palace is the result of the last major restoration that took place in the first half of the 17th century, when the building was renovated in Late Renaissance style. The ground floor is built from ashlar blocks, having in the center a water portal with a round arch and a keystone with an anthropomorphic head. The mezzanine consists of four windows with small balconies with a metal railing. The main floor has a central single-lancet window similar to the water portal below, and two pairs of lateral single-lancet windows, all joined by a single continuous balcony. The second floor is formed by five equal single-lancet windows. All the windows of the first and second floors, except the central one of the piano nobile, are surmounted by triangular tympanums.   HOW TO GET THERE The closest Read more [...]

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    Palazzo Soranzo Piovene

    Palazzo Soranzo Piovene is a beautiful palace in Venice, located in the Cannaregio district, overlooking the Grand Canal, between Palazzo Molin Erizzo and Palazzo Emo alla Maddalena.   SHORT HISTORY The palace dates back to the early decades of the 16th century. The building was acquired by the Soranzo family and, in 1760, it passed to the Piovene family through the marriage between Cecilia Soranzo and Girolamo Piovene. Today, the palace is the seat of the Guardia di Finanza, which occupies the main floor and the mezzanine. The other part of the palazzo, built around a central courtyard, consists of private residences.   ARCHITECTURE The project is traditionally attributed to the architect Sante Lombardo. The facade is characterized by two three-light windows, flanked on the right by two single windows and on the left by one. The windows are separated by four rectangular and two round decorations. Inside, the atrium and the staircase are remarkable. The palace is enriched by an internal courtyard with a well, on the back of which there is a second wing. The palace has also a garden.   HOW TO GET THERE The palace is located about 450 meters away from the vaporetto stop of Read more [...]

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    Palazzo Molin Querini

    Palazzo Molin Querini, also known as Palazzo Molin alla Maddalena, is a palace located in the Cannaregio district, in Venice, overlooking the Grand Canal at the point where it merges with the Rio della Maddalena. The palace is next to Palazzo Emo alla Maddalena.   SHORT HISTORY Before passing to the Querini family, the palace belonged to the ancient Molin family, from which the Doge Francesco Molin was part. In the 18th century, in the palace lived another important member of the Molin family, the Bishop of Brescia Giovanni Molin. The last reconstruction of the palace dates back to the 18th century.   ARCHITECTURE The palace presents a facade divided in two. On the left, there is the water portal, surmounted by a Palladian window (a Palladian window, or serliana, is an architectural element composed of a round arched central window, symmetrically flanked by two rectangular windows), and three separate windows. On the right, we can find two rectangular windows, facing the Rio della Maddalena. In addition to the ground floor and the main floor (piano nobile), there is also a mezzanine, an upper floor and an attic. The palace has a very small interior courtyard.   HOW TO GET Read more [...]

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    Palazzo Emo alla Maddalena

    Palazzo Emo alla Maddalena is a palace built in Baroque style in Venice, overlooking the Grand Canal, between Palazzo Molin Querini and Palazzo Soranzo Piovene.   SHORT HISTORY The palace was built at the beginning of the 17th century, and aquired around 1616 by the Emo family, for the marriage of Alvise Emo with Eleonora Rodriguez of the Diego family. The palace was bought with a part of her dowry. Around the middle of the 18th century, the owners were Francesco and Gerolamo Emo, who completed around the same time the adjacent Molin Querini Palace.   ARCHITECTURE The facade is divided into two parts, having a double orientation, both towards the Grand Canal and to the Rio della Maddalena. The facade is spread over four floors, presenting a ground floor, a mezzanine, a piano nobile and an attic. The expressive power of the facade is concentrated in the group consisting of the water portal and the overlying serliana (a serliana, or Palladian window, is an architectural element composed of a round arched central section, symmetrically flanked by two rectangular windows, surmounted by a lintel). On the main floor, there are also single windows, two on the right and three on Read more [...]

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    Palazzo Contarini Fasan

    Palazzo Contarini Fasan, also called Casa di Desdemona (House of Desdemona), is one of the smallest palaces overlooking the Grand Canal, located in the sestiere of San Marco, in Venice.   SHORT HISTORY Palazzo Contarini was built around 1475 and belonged to the Contarini family. The name Fasan is probably derived from the passion of its owners for hunting pheasants. Thanks to legend, the palace is traditionally considered the home of Desdemona, a character in William Shakespeare’s play Othello.   ARCHITECTURE The palace has a Gothic facade developed in height, on three floors, with no access to water. On the ground floor, there are 3 small rectangular windows. On the first floor, there are three lancet windows separated by white stone columns, and a balcony. On the second floor, we can find two lancet windows, and between them, under a small square opening, there is the large coat of arms of the Contarini family, in bas-relief. The top of the facade is crossed by a jagged cornice, under which can be observed the traces of the 15th-century frescoes that once embellished the entire facade.   HOW TO GET THERE The closest waterbus station is Giglio, on the Line 1, but Read more [...]

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    Palazzo Smith Mangilli Valmarana

    Palazzo Smith Mangilli Valmarana is a palace overlooking the Grand Canal, located in the sestiere of Cannaregio, in Venice. The palace is known above all as the residence of Joseph Smith, the British consul in Venice between 1744 and 1760. John Smith was also a patron of arts and a collector, the agent of Canaletto for several years and the facilitator for the purchases of his works by the British aristocrats.   SHORT HISTORY Originally, the palace was a Byzantine Gothic building, owned by the Trevisan nobles from 1518 to 1666, and later by the Ceffis family. In 1740, the palace became the seat of the English Embassy and the residence of Smith, and it was transformed according to the taste of the era. In 1743, the painter Antonio Visentini designed the new facade of the palace and started the works, which were completed in 1751. Smith died in 1770, and the palace was sold by his widow to the Count Giuseppe Mangilli in 1784. The count added the two top floors and entrusted the redecoration of the interior to the architect Giannantonio Selva, who also built the La Fenice Theater. Later, the palace was sold to the Valmarana family. Read more [...]

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    Palazzo Cavalli-Franchetti

    Palazzo Cavalli-Franchetti is a palace in Venice, located in the sestiere of San Marco, in the immediate vicinity of the Accademia Bridge. Since 1999, it belongs to the Venetian Institute of Science, Letters and Arts, which hosts frequent cultural events.   SHORT HISTORY The palace was built in Gothic style in the second half of the 15th century by the Marcello family. It was inhabited later by the Gussoni and the Cavalli families. In 1847, the palace was ceded to the young Archduke Friedrich Ferdinand of Austria, who initiated a series of works for the modernization of the building. Later, the palazzo passed to Enrico, Count of Chambord, who commissioned the architect Giovanni Battista Meduna to renovate the structure. Meduna redesigned the palace, which became one of the emblems of the Venetian 19th century. In 1878, the building was bought by the Baron Raimondo Franchetti. Franchetti started a radical restoration under the direction of the architect Camillo Boito. In September 1922, the widow of Raimondo, Sarah Luisa de Rothschild, sold the building to the Istituto Federale di Credito per il Risorgimento delle Venezie, which proceeded to a new phase of works and functional adaptations.   ARCHITECTURE The palace is a Read more [...]

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    Palazzo Dolfin Manin

    Palazzo Dolfin Manin is a palace overlooking the Grand Canal, not far from the Rialto Bridge, located in the sestiere of San Marco, in Venice. Today, the palace houses the Venice branch of the Banca d’Italia.   SHORT HISTORY The palace was built in 1536 by Jacopo Sansovino for the Dolfin family, by merging two pre-existing buildings from the Middle Ages. In 1801, the palace became the residence of the noble Manin family. Ludovico Manin, the last Doge of Venice, commissioned the architect Giannantonio Selva to make important modifications and reconstructions to the palace. The architect eliminated the inner courtyard and replaced the entry staircase with a more sumptuous one in the Neoclassical style. In 1797, Ludovico Manin accepted the surrender to the French army of Napoleon. After that moment, he lived for another five years segregated in the palace. The palace remained the property of the Manin family until 1867, when it passed to the Banca Nazionale del Regno. Some restorations were carried out between 1968 and 1971, and a further restoration was completed in 2002.   ARCHITECTURE The facade of the palace was built between 1538 and 1547 by the great architect Jacopo Tatti, known as Sansovino. It is Read more [...]

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    Casa dei Tre Oci

    Casa dei Tre Oci (House of Three Eyes), also known as Casa di Maria, is a palace overlooking the Giudecca Canal, located near Le Zitelle, in the sestiere of Dorsoduro, on the Giudecca island, in Venice. The name of the palace comes from the three large windows on its facade, which resemble three eyes (òci meaning eyes in the Venetian dialect).   SHORT HISTORY Casa dei Tre Oci is a 20th century palazzo linked to many illustrious names. It was built between 1912 and 1913 by the painter Mario de Maria, who made it his new Venetian residence. The painter, wanting to commemorate his beloved daughter Silvia, who disappeared a few years earlier, built the house with three large windows on the facade, representing the three surviving members of his family: himself, his wife Emilia Voight and his son Astolfo. The mullioned window placed above them symbolizes the deceased daughter. In this palace, after the death of de Maria, people linked to the art world stayed and lived, like the architect Renzo Piano. In 1970, Enrico Maria Salerno set some scenes of the film The Anonymous Venetian in the palace. Today, the palace is owned by Polymnia Venezia, a company Read more [...]

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    Palazzo Miani Coletti Giusti

    Palazzo Miani Coletti Giusti is a beautiful palace overlooking the Grand Canal, located in the sestiere of Cannaregio, in Venice. The palace is adjacent to the wonderful Ca d’Oro.   SHORT HISTORY The palace, as engraved on the facade, was built in 1766. The palace was own in turn by the Miani family, by the Coletti and the Giusti. Today, together with Ca d’Oro, it houses the art museum Galleria Giorgio Franchetti.   ARCHITECTURE The palace has a light green facade, work of the painter and architect Antonio Visentini, and is built on four floors. Overall, in the architecture of the facade we can find various allusions to the style promoted by the architect Andrea Palladio. The building has some peculiarities, such as the presence of the four water portals surrounded by Doric semicolumns and separated by three niches containing statues depicting personalities of the time, of the many single-lancet windows that replace the typical mullioned windows, of a cornice with an unusual arch in the middle and of an imposing dormer between two terraces with balustrades. The top floor is characterized by the presence of two circular niches closed by triangular tympanums.   HOW TO GET THERE The closest Read more [...]

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    Palazzetto Foscari del Prà

    Palazzetto Foscari del Prà is a small palace in the Venetian Gothic style overlooking the Grand Canal, in the sestiere of Cannaregio, in Venice. The palace is located near the Church of Santa Sofia, at equal distance between Palazzo Michiel dalle Colonne and Ca d’Oro.   SHORT HISTORY The palace was built in the second half of the 15th century. In 1488, the Foscari family bought the building from the Longin family. In 1520, the ambassador of the Duke of Mantua and Duke Federico Gonzaga lived here for a certain period of time. In the early 1700s, the prominent German merchant Sigismund Streit lived there. After being owned by the Del Prà family, the Giannetti Hotels Group bought the palace in 2003 and transformed it in a 4-star hotel.   ARCHITECTURE The facade of the palace, without particular architectural merit, is noticeable thanks to the Gothic and asymmetric polifora (window divided by multiple columns). On the top floor, the facade was badly remodeled, with the balconies of the windows invading the marble framing of the window below. On the top floor, we can also find the coat of arms of the Foscari family.   HOW TO GET THERE The closest waterbus Read more [...]

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    Palazzo Cavalli

    Palazzo Cavalli, also known as Palazzo Corner Martinengo, is a palace overlooking the Grand Canal, located in the sestiere of San Marco, in Venice.   SHORT HISTORY The palace was built in the 16th century and underwent several renovations in the following centuries. At the beginning of the 16th century, Bartolomeo d’Alviano lived there, great military leader of the Venetian Republic, who distinguished himself in the defence of the city against the Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian. In 1521, following the marriage of a daughter of Alvise Corner with Agostino Contarini, the palace passed to the Contarini family. Around 1830, the palace was inherited by the Mocenigo family, who, in turn, sold the building in 1858 to Maria Dorotea Ulbricht. From her, Palazzo Cavalli passed to the Cavalieri family and later to the Ravenna family. In the 19th century, it was the place where the American writer James Fenimore Cooper lived for a while. Initially transformed into a hotel, the palace is now home to the Tide Forecast and Warning Center of the Municipality of Venice.   ARCHITECTURE The facade of the palace, an example of Venetian Gothic style from the 16th century, is three stories high. The ground floor has Read more [...]

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    Palazzo Dario

    After you pass Peggy Guggenheim Museum, on Grand Canal, coming from the Ponte dell’Accademia, you have on your right a relatively small but very elegant building, built in a Gothic style with Renaissance elements, called Palazzo Dario or, closer to the Venetian language, Ca’ Dario.   SHORT HISTORY It is not known exactly when Palazzo Dario was built, but some say that it underwent a major reconstruction in 1487 and the architect Pietro Lombardo was the one who dealt with the project. The architect restored the palace for the Venetian Senator Giovanni Dario, an important man of those times, diplomat and trader alike. After the death of Giovanni Dario, in 1494, the palace was inherited by his illegitimate daughter, Marietta. Married to Vincenzo Barbaro, she has practically brought the palace to the Barbaro family, which already owned two palaces – one in the immediate vicinity (Palazzo Barbaro Wolkoff) and one on the other side of Canal Grande, closer to Ponte dell’Accademia, Palazzo Barbaro. Ca’ Dario will be in the possession of the Barbaro family until the middle of the 19th century. After that, it will change its owners several times until 2006, when it will be bought by some Americans Read more [...]

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    Palazzo Barbarigo

    The palace with one of the most characteristic facades overlooking the Grand Canal, Palazzo Barbarigo, is located in the sestiere Dorsoduro, not far from the Ponte dell’Accademia, between Palazzo Da Mula Morosini and Campo San Vio.   SHORT HISTORY Palazzo Barbarigo was built in the 16th century, in the middle of the Renaissance. At the end of the 19th century, the palace became the headquarters of the Compagnia Venezia Murano, producer of glass and mosaics. The company renovated the building and had the facade covered with mosaics designed by the painter Giulio Carlini and applied in 1886 by Fratelli Testolini (Testolini Brothers), owners of the Fratelli Testolini company, specialized in the production of sculpted artistic furniture, glassware, mosaics, textiles and furnishing accessories.   ARCHITECTURE Palazzo Barbarigo is a typical sixteenth-century building, of beautiful proportions, with simple arched windows, juxtaposed at the center of the upper floors and linked horizontally by marble bands. The frieze between the upper floors shows thirty-five cherubs pursuing various arts, including painting, drawing, sculpture and architecture. The two murals commemorate the 16th century royal visits in Venice of the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V, speaking to Tiziano on the scaffolding of St. Mark’s Basilica, and of Read more [...]

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    Palazzo Michiel dalle Colonne

    Approximately 250 meters to the Rialto Bridge, overlooking the Canal Grande, there is a palace known for the architectural structure of its ground floor, with a portico along the whole facade divided by very tall columns, Palazzo Michiel dalle Colonne.   SHORT HISTORY The palace may have been built in the 13th century by the Grimani family, whose coat of arms is carved in an old well in the courtyard. Originally, it probably followed the Venetian-Byzantine style typical of the period. From 1661, the palace is attested as the property of the Zen family, and is named dalle Colonne (of the Columns). To them, we owe the partial rebuilding to a design by Antonio Gaspari, completed in 1697. In 1702, the palace was given to Ferdinando Carlo di Gonzaga-Nevers, the last duke of Mantua and Monferrato. He lived there from 1706, when he was exiled by the Austrians who emerged victorious from the War of the Spanish Succession. In 1712, the palace was bought by the Conigli family, nobles of Verona. It seems they have never used it and, two years later, in 1714, they sold it to the Michiel, already owners of various other properties. Like the Zen before, Read more [...]

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    Ca’ Vendramin Calergi

    Ca’ Vendramin Calergi is an imposing palace on the Grand Canal, in Venice, where the composer Richard Wagner died in 1883. Also, from 1950, Palazzo Vendramin Calergi hosts the oldest casino in the world, Casino di Venezia, established in 1638.   SHORT HISTORY The palace was commissioned in the late 15th century by the Loredan family to the famous architect Mauro Codussi. The building was his last work, brought to completion in 1509, five years after his death. In 1581, the palace was sold to the Duke of Brunswick and, after some legal troubles, in 1589, it was bought by a rich nobleman, Vettor Calergi, for his wedding with Isabetta Gritti. Vettor Calergi had only one daughter, Marina, who was married, in 1608, to Vincenzo Grimani. The palace passed, by inheritance, to the sons of Marina with the obligation to take also the surname Calergi. The three sons of Marina remained famous for their ferocity – after the cruel murder of Francesco Querini Stampalia, they were banned from the Republic and deprived of the property, but after a donation to the Senate for war expenses, they were reinstated in assets and titles. In 1739, for dynastic reasons, the palace passed to Read more [...]

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    Palazzo Flangini

    Palazzo Flangini is, practically, the first truly monumental building that you meet on the Grand Canal, in Venice, when you are traveling with the vaporetto from the railway station, heading to the Rialto Bridge. Near the Scuola dei Morti, the Flangini Palace consists of two-thirds of an unfinished building, probably designed by Giuseppe Sardi in the second half of the 17th century.   SHORT HISTORY It is said that the palace remained unfinished because one of the two brothers who inherited it, in spite of the other, had one of the wings destroyed, cutting the palace in half. The reality, much simpler and more prosaic, is that the old owner lacked the funds and was unable to buy the nearby area necessary for the completion of the building. The building have been built between the years 1664 and 1682 and is attributed to the architect Giuseppe Sardi by the art historian of the 18th century Tommaso Temanza, but some think it could be the project of Baldassarre Longhena. Currently, the building is divided into several private properties. Following an important restoration, the entrance hall and the portego of the building have been taken over by the Valorizzazioni Culturali society, with Read more [...]

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    Scuola dei Morti

    Scuola dei Morti (School of the Dead) is a small and charming building from the 17th century, overlooking the Grand Canal, in Venice, placed between Palazzo Flangini and the apse of the Church of San Geremia.   SHORT HISTORY The building belonged to the Congregazione della Santissima Madonna del Suffragio dei Morti, known also as the School of the Dead, a religious congregation that, in 1624, has joined the homonymous Confraternity of Rome. A few years earlier, in 1615, the congregation held meetings in the Church of San Geremia, until the parish priest gave them a piece of land in the ancient cemetery, to erect a chapel for the meetings, permission approved by the Venetian Senate in 1659. At the expense of the Savorgnan family, the school was built, but was then destroyed during an Austrian bombing in 1849. Today, after an integral reconstruction, the building is used by the parish of San Geremia.   ARCHITECTURE The facade of the one-storey building is simple and has a skull in the center, between two large windows, with an inscription below reminding about the congregation of Scuola dei Morti.   HOW TO GET THERE The best place to admire the Scuola dei Read more [...]

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    Palazzo Malipiero

    Palazzo Malipiero is a palace located on the eastern bank of the Canal Grande, just 100 meters away from Ponte dell’Accademia. The palace is very close to Palazzo Grassi, separated only by the small San Samuele Square. The palace is famous, first of all, as the residence of Giacomo Casanova for a few years, when he was still a teenager. In the chambers of this palace, it seems, the Venetian lover learned the art of love that he will practice so tenaciously later.   SHORT HISTORY The palace, also known as Ca’ Grande di San Samuele, was built in the 11th century by the Soranzo family. At the beginning of the 15th century, the palace was in the possession of a powerful Venetian family – the Cappello family, following a marriage. By the mid-sixteenth century, the Cappello family comisioned the widening of the palace and the construction of the facade facing the Canal Grande, which still exists today. Also in the 16th century, through another union, the palace passes from the possession of the Cappello family to that of the Malipiero family. Like the other owners, the Malipiero family took care of the palace, being responsible for a series of Read more [...]

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    Palazzo Gussoni Grimani Dalla Vida

    Found across the Canal Grande from Ca’ Pesaro, between Palazzo Ruoda and Rio di Noale, Palazzo Gussoni Grimani Dalla Vida is one of those historic buildings that support the architectural image of a city. Venice, to be a true open-air museum, needs each of these buildings, which, side by side, build a charming ensemble.   SHORT HISTORY The palace was designed by the architect Michele Sanmicheli and built between 1548-1556 for the Gussoni family. In the following century, the edifice served as the headquarters for the Accademia Delfica, founded in 1647 by Francesco Gussoni. After the death of the last Gussoni, in 1736, the palace, on the line of kinship, was given to the Minio family. In 1978, the building was sold to the Grimani family, and later, in 1814, it came into possession of the Dalla Vida family, recognized as the last owners, before the palace became the property of the Italian state. Between 1614 and 1618, the Gussoni Grimani Palace was the residence of the English diplomat Sir Henry Wotton, the Doge’s counselor at that time, and also the author of a limited number of poems and translations.   ARCHITECTURE The façade of the palace was initially adorned Read more [...]

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    Gritti Palace

    The majestic Gritti Palace is a palazzo located across the Grand Canal from the Church of Santa Maria della Salute, in the Sestieri of San Marco, Venice. A place of exceptional art and elegance, the restored Gritti Palace retains its reassuringly intimate and familiar feel. The Gritti Hotel is known for impassioned service, a delectable culinary experience and an intimate wellness haven. The reference point for the world’s elite at international city events such as the Biennale, Carnival and the Venice Film Festival. After a meticulous restoration, explore the hotel’s original wooden ceilings, original entrance flooring, dressing-table mirrors and 18th century wall lamps, hand-made in Murano, and more. The epitome of luxury, the Gritti Signature Suite Collection showcases the hotel’s rich historical past.   SHORT HISTORY Palazzo Pisani Gritti dates back to 1475 when the Doge of Venice, Andrea Gritti, commissioned it. At first, the official residence of the Gritti family, the palace was later used as the residence of the Vatican ambassadors to Venice. Over the years, The Gritti Palace has welcomed many famous guests. It was home to successive noble families, such as the Pisanis and again the Grittis in 1814. Some years later it was sold to Read more [...]